In a previous post, I outlined the complexities of your disaster recovery infrastructure. There is a LOT to think about, and for many decision makers, the whole process can be overwhelming and feel a lot like you’re at sea with no life jacket. But there is help at hand. The key is finding an expert – whether a partner, full service provider, or industry guru – who has built and continues to manage complex primary and DR infrastructures. Disaster Recovery as a Service …

Why has the demand for disaster recovery always existed? It’s because even though data is not accounted for on the balance sheet, data is valuable. And the value of data has risen exponentially, becoming the lifeblood of organizations. Disaster recovery is a key component in protecting the value of data as an asset for the business. In this post, I’ll discuss the historical problems behind disaster recovery and how it is now cost effective, simple and easy. Historically, the problem with disaster recovery …

Disaster recovery is neither simple nor easy. The underpinnings of a successful disaster recovery strategy are complex and often difficult to implement and maintain. If you lead a technology department, you have a running list of disaster recovery issues that rapidly goes from manageable to overwhelming. It is a time-consuming and complicated endeavor. You know that your data systems are critical to your business. Without them, your business soon grinds to a not-so-graceful halt. The risk of losing business compounds with every …

Picture this: Your business requires the medical and payment data of three million people, one-third of whom are Medicare recipients. Because of this, you have a big red bullseye painted on your infrastructure and all sorts of seedy characters want access to that information, either for themselves or to sell in the dark underbelly of the internet. “Don’t worry,” you say, “we’re protecting that data.” You have a security infrastructure in place, so you figure everything is fine. But how …

Let’s talk about your personal belongings for a second. When you apply for homeowner’s insurance, you’re asked to value your property. How much is your computer worth?  All of those tools you have tucked away in the garage? What about your wardrobe? Kitchen supplies, furniture and so on also must be taken into account. The reason is obvious of course: If someone were to steal them, you can file a claim and get reinbursed based on the value of your possessions. …

Note: This is the third of three blog entries from Online Tech Director of Infrastructure Nick Lumsden reflecting on his key takeaways from EMC World 2014: 1. Speed of Change, 2. Shift in Ownership of IT Dollars, 3. Transition to IT-as-a-Service. Speed of change and a shift in ownership of IT dollars – two topics covered in previous posts – have been the driving force behind the topic of the third: the paradigm shift of internal IT departments to IT-as-a-Service, …

Note: This is the second of three blog entries from Online Tech Director of Infrastructure Nick Lumsden reflecting on his key takeaways from EMC World 2014: 1. Speed of Change, 2. Shift in Ownership of IT Dollars, 3. Transition to IT-as-a-Service. The days of CIOs or CTOs owning all of an organization’s IT dollars are over. Those dollars have been slowly migrating into Line of Business (LOB) budgets. Agile tightly coupled the business and IT organizations, leading to this shift. …

Note: This is the first of three blog entries from Online Tech Director of Infrastructure Nick Lumsden reflecting on his key takeaways from EMC World 2014: 1. Speed of Change, 2. Shift in Ownership of IT Dollars, 3. Transition to IT-as-a-Service. In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore wrote a paper about computer chip performance doubling every 18 months. Today, we call that Moore’s law. Kryder’s law says memory efficiency doubles every 12 months. Nielsen’s law says bandwidth doubles every 21 …

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