server room.jpgIf you tried to catch up from Labor Day weekend by opening your Office 365 email this morning and found your computer still seemed to be in holiday mode, there’s a reason for that.

According to a couple of different reports, one of Microsoft’s Texas data centers has suffered an outage due to a spike in internal temperature, causing a shutdown of servers hosted there.

The shutdown was automatically initiated after local temperatures exceeded the set threshold so asto prevent even more catastrophic system failure. (Think about it. There’s thousands of servers running simultaneously, so it’s going to be hot in there without some cooling systems.) While this is definitely a good thing for everyone in the long run, unfortunately, in the short term it means that thousands of people have had trouble accessing their Microsoft apps including Office 365 accounts, One Drive shared folders, and even Xbox games.

There has been no official comment from Microsoft yet, but the company has directed customers to its Twitter account (@AzureSupport) or its Azure status page, which is unfortunately also allegedly affected by the outage. It has said it will release a new update at  8 pm UTC, or 4 pm EDT.

Outages in the public cloud world are rare, but as we see here, they do happen. But if you’re nervous about moving to the public cloud for this reason, don’t be. The public cloud is still a reliable solution for small businesses and enterprises alike. If you’re wary of moving to the cloud though, one way you can protect yourself is by opting for a multi cloud solution. Using multiple cloud providers builds in the redundancy so that if one provider goes down, you can still run your workloads and maintain operations. In fact, 81 percent of enterprises surveyed said they have a multi-cloud strategy in place.

We can help you architect the combination of public, private or multiple clouds that’s right for your business. Contact us today to see how we can help you get started.