Tag: aws

As mentioned previously, server tagging in public cloud offers many benefits, including the ability to better track your cloud resources and get more meaningful KPI metrics for financial and usage reporting. How do you tag your servers though? In this post, we’ll offer tips on how to tag servers in Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services. No matter how you organize your tags, it’s important to remember that people aren’t perfect. Therefore, you’ll need to have a protective mechanism in place …

For organizations that use public cloud services, the biggest goal is to optimize the usage and spend of those services. It all comes back to cost management and control–it’s all too easy to lose control of your cloud spend, especially when you don’t know who is spinning up more servers or whether they’re being used in the most cost-effective way. CIOs are experimenting with server tagging as a way to overcome this challenge. What is server tagging? Essentially, it’s creating …

Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure are two of the biggest names in public cloud computing. Which one is right for you? To help you make that decision, let’s talk about what each provider brings to the public cloud table, and key differences between them. Compute power AWS: AWS EC2 users can configure their own VMs or choose pre-configured machine images, or customize Mis. Users choose size, power, memory capacity and number of VMs, and choose from different regions …

When it comes to cloud computing, the question enterprises now ask is, “Which cloud is best?” More than 80 percent of organizations are running workloads in the cloud, and the IT service industry has joined the fray with a variety of different cloud services and new buzzwords to represent them. What do they mean, and is there a difference between them? Let’s review: Cloud broker: A cloud broker is someone who acts as a kind of middleman between an organization interested in …

Amazon’s S3 outage yesterday brought down a large part of the internet, leaving thousands of companies and their customers stranded. While the outage itself only lasted about four hours, the effects were felt for much longer, and it highlighted how reliable the public cloud truly is. One of the hardest things about cloud adoption for CIOs is dealing with the sense of losing control. For many CIOs, this came to light yesterday in AWS’ outage. That sense of loss of control …

Would you pay $999 per hour for a cloud server? Apparently, Amazon’s EC2 cloud servers spiked to $999.99 per hour when their supply was recently constrained.  The high bidder paid close to $1000 per hour and others got bumped off of their servers. One month’s use of the server at this price would cost a ridiculous $729,992.70 – more than the cost to purchase an entire mainframe and host it in a high-end data center for 5 years. Admittedly, it …

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